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environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in now up to two years to stool these coins. not only do they steal customer le 100,000 they sto coins from the owner specifically. >> what do you think is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation? there are no laws? why should they? dory.t is the fed assumes there's no consumer protection whatsoever and without the consumer protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is untraceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it is anonymous. it is hard to track down the criminals. it is hard to get the money back. , i'm noto seems to me a lawyer by any means, establishing standing, the most basic legal principle that any suit has to go through, is virtually impossible because of the way bitcoin is designed it so there is no location and place. that is correct. there's no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money back is quite low. what is very interesting
of standards and we also see that there is no control environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in for up to two years to steal these coins buried not only did they still customer coins, but they still 100,000 coins specifically from the owner of gox. >> what is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation and there are no safeguards so why should they? >> right, that is the sad story. there is no consumer protection whatsoever. without that protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is not traceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it's anonymous so clearly is hard to track down the culprits and it is hard to get the money back. seems that the most basic legal principle is virtually impossible because of the weight bitcoin is operating. there is no location in place for such currency. >> that's correct. there is no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money act is quite low. what's interesting ab
the that the evidence we brought out in the environment of public works committee was new and hadn't been adequately considered. that was dr. o'connor's work showing the downstream harm from those near the mining of the tar sands and the testimony from a community organizer in texas about those who have health damage because of the refining of tar sands-type crude oil. and then those who are near the pepco, the waste product of it in detroit and chicago with really telling stories about children literally having to flee the baseball field to get away from the cloud of choking dust that was blown off the dump. >> mm-hmm. dr. o'connor, i keep hearing this, that the tar sands oil is far more toxic than anything else that the being refined anywhere in the world. is that correct, sir? >> absolutely. >> it is correct that there's nothing worse coming out of the ground on the face of the earth than this oil that's going to come out of the tar sands. >> all the information we have supports that. >> dr. o'connor, how toxic is it when it comes to imposing possible health risks on society? >> i guess from the
is an attempt to deal with this country's global foot print to create new strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it
, and which prohibited commonsense uses of cheap and safe fuel that could actually help the environment. and department of transportation regulations that, without increasing safety, vastly increased record eping for ready-mix concrete drivers, unnecessarily limited their hours and suppressed their wages. title 2 of the alert act helps to protect people like bob sells and his workers from regulations that ask job creators to achieve the unyou a cheeveble. do not -- the unachievable, do not help to control targets, suppress hours and wages for no good reasons and inundate americans with unnecessary paperwork. title 3 of the alert act offers long-needed help to small business people like carl harris, the vice president and general manager of carl harris company in wichita, kansas. mr. harris is a small homebuilder. every day he has to fight and overcome the fact that government regulations now account for 25% of the final price of a new single-family home. mr. harris participants in small business review panels, existing law uses to try to lower the cost of regulations for small businesse
steps in advancing and protecting human rights. to foster an environment that allows for dialogue and political reconciliation, some of the specific areas we encourage progress is in releasing prisoners who have -- encouraging confidence building and reconciliation and accountability for allegations of security force excesses. this, weghout all of unequivocally reject violence on all sides and we want to encourage the positive evolution bahrain.jn -- of >> about venezuela. thishreat continues in country against freedom of expression. president maduro is opening a news conference about peace. about it?our comments >> on more specific venezuela developments, i would have to give the floor to marie. but with respect to the human rights report, we certainly identified a number of key concerns in development in 2013. the passage of presidential decree powers, increases of power in the executive branch, we documented legal actions against tv stations, media outlets and journalists. we also documented the use of the judiciary to intimidate and selectively prosecute political union busine
had. it was in a totally different environment. and now i have two, i have a congressional blackberry and a campaign iphone plus a wireless beeper i use up here. i've got high definition television sets. you name it, my 8-year-old son has a laptop computer and a tablet. a whole different ball game. and the way we use what we now call the internet, the way we use wireless communications, they all need to be brought up to speed, and if we can get any bipartisanship at all in the next congress, i think you'll see us do that. >> host: what kind of time frame are you looking? >> guest: i'm chairman emeritus, this is the chairman -- fred upton, greg walden, i'm a spear carrier. but i hope to be, i plan to be very involved. i would hope that with the right environment we could do a bill in the next congress. and in this congress mr. walden and mr. upton have both told me personally and they've said pluckily they're going to be -- publicly they're going to be lots of hearings to set the groundwork to do it. >> host: brendan sasso. >> another issue you've been involved in a lot is online gambl
need to change the environment that we live in. so that means better policies, access and availability to healthier food for all americans, so in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and many efforts are under way to make that happen. >> is there any way, you mentioned the difference between what's happening in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and you also mention the change in the women, infants and children nutrition program. how much of that can you break out. >> i know this is a small incident but how much do you know in these kinds of programs is it having an effect? >> well, we mow that children who are eligible for assistance like wic serve underprivileged chrn and those changes are very important for them. but if we pull apart the recent data we're talking about now and the decline in the obesity rates it starts to unravel when you look at the disparities. soç we know that white children have lower rates than black children and hispanic children. and the disparities are quite striking. and that tells us more effort has to be put into reaching underserv
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
in the environment, who knows what the next eight months will bring. >> fair enough. candidate recruiting is everything. i remember various conversati s conversations. i know on one hand you've had people that you've had conversations with, that have said, you know what, talk to me in '16 when they think it will be more democrats, knowing democratic voters, hillary clinton at the top of the ticket, the shutdown, it got you a few candidates you didn't think you would get because of the environment change in that small period of time. but have you found that you still are struggling getting some people off the fence because they'd rather run in a presidential year? >> no, not at all. in fact, you went through the list. what unifies these top-tier candidates right now is the fact that they are problem solvers. you know, we didn't have to recruit many of them. they recruited themselves because they'd had it with the shutdowns, with republican recklessness and irresponsibility. they are problem solvers in battleground districts. this is our initial rollout. there will be more. we'll have a ve
-income americans are left living in unhealthy and unsafe environments all because they don't have the money or the connections to fight back. okay, listen up! i'm re-workin' the menu. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition in charge™. [ bottle ] ensure®. here in philadelphia you can access a philly cheesesteak anytime, day or night. just like you can access geico anytime, day or night. there is only one way to celebrate this unique similarity. witness the cheesesteak shuffle. ♪ cheesesteak, cheesesteak ♪ ♪ it's the cheesesteak shuffle! huh! ♪ ♪ every day, all day, cheesesteak, cheesesteak! ♪ ♪ every night, all night cheesesteak, cheesesteak! ♪ ♪ 9 a.m. cheesesteak! ♪ 2 p.m. cheesesteak! ♪ 4 a.m. cheesesteak! ♪ any time (ruh!) >>geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. before those little pieces would get in between my dentures and my gum and it was u
the current situation. given the environment, obviously this is having a serious effect here in ukraine. we have heard in late-breaking news or in late evening news that the ukrainians are so concerned about this that they're moving security forces up to the border in areas in the north and the east of the country, not in crimea, so clearly, the ukrainians are very afraid about a larger conflict with russia, not just crimea. >> i was fascinated because i hear these people in the crimean region speaking to our reporters. you're fluent in russian. these people who are speaking in crimea are speaking in russian versus those in kiev speaking ukrainian. >> absolutely right. i mean, there are long standing relationships between russia and ukraine. there's a sense of pride in this part of the country, signs are not in russian, they're in ukrainian, a different letter alphabet. certainly in crimea, predominantly they do speak russian. language is a big issue and it's been made a big issue by the russians themselves, because there's been a plan to make ukrainian the official language and push russia
that is part of our environment, utilizing that in a way that generates an electricity and does it in a benign way, is a very strong cornerstone advanced by the president in this effort. also the $4. 2 billion he brings forth to provide for innovation and create new outcomes for energy purposes, not only with efficiency and generation but the transmission of that energy supply and looking at efforts to expand and make permanent the production tax credits that are so important for renewable energy in this country. so those are two good, very valuable investments. let me then just highlight a few others that i believe will be a progress i outcome if we are to accept this notion here in congress. one would be to address the clean energy research program and the president does that with a major down payment for clean energy research, he also addresses the advanced research project agency in the energy capacity, acronymed out at arpa-e. it commits a very laser sharp focus on research as it relates to innovation in the energy sector. will all those outcomes be successful? perhaps not. in fact, the c
environment. that they're working on a report about the cia's detention and interrogation programs. >> the long beach plus telegram says former secretary of state hillary clinton is comparing russia's actions in ukraine to nazi germany. -- places like czechoslovakia and romania and other places. hitler kept saying they're not being treated right. i must go and protect my people, and that's what's gotten everybody so nervous. reporter karen robes meeks at the event, confirmed the quote. says >> the ceo of general motors is launching an internal review ataunching issue how they delayed reporting a defective switch. the cars involved in the recall are from 2007 before. >>> and the candidates facing off to be the next governor of d the "sta texas. h the lone star state held the first statewide primary tuesday. republicans chose greg abbott to succeed rick perry. wendy davis coasted to the democratic nomination. >>> it's 7:19.7:19 ahead, the $100 million bet to legalize gambling and what it hat may mean for the mob. first, time to check your local weather. >> announcer:
. >> the reality of reduced resources and a challenging and changing strategic environment requires us to prioritize and make difficult choices. some of those choices we must make now. >> reporter: despite the many problems and the cost overruns the military has no plans to scrap the f-35. it argues current fighter jets are obsolete, and china and russia are developing fighters that can outfly the jet. rosiland jordan, al jazeera, washington. >>> coming up on al jazeera america, it has been almost a year now since pope francis has become pontiff. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. here are your headlines at this hour. secretary of state john kerry is in paris trying to diffuse the crisis in ukraine. he'll hold face-to-face talks with sergei lavrov. lavrov claiming there are no russian troops on the ground in crimea. >>> the black sea fleet is blocking all traffic in the crimean area. >>> the west virginia state house will vote on a water protection bill to try to prevent another chemical spill like the one that can tom nated the water in january. if passed it will
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that is a little bit more forgiving. gwen: launching a new effort to help young men and boys of color. covering the week pete williams of nbc news. ed o'keefe of "the washington post." and michael sheerer of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> it's one of the most amazing things we build and it doesn't even fly. we build classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators, we preserve habitats and serving america's veterans. every day thousands of boeing volunteers help their community be the best they can be, building something better for all of us. >> whether it's discovering an aspirin a day can prevent heart attacks worldwide or regenerating new heart muscles, our goal is to develop treatment. brigham and women's hospital. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- prudential. addition funding is
. the project would be bad for the environment. in january the u.s. state department released a report saying it would have little environmental impact. >> it is moving on a busy highway between houston and dallas, texas after a highway was turned into a ice skating rink. causing gridlock on the 30 mile stretch of the highway for about 16 hours. >> people stuck in their cars for 14 hours. we had people sleep in the parking lot in their cars because there was no place to go. there were no hotel rooms left. >> traffic began moving late last night. law enforcement urging caution and to watch out for the black ice. >> the weather continues to be a big story across the country. the snow may be gone but freezing temperatures they are not. >> another blast of arctic air celting across half of occur ur country. >> the temperatures seeing well below average across the midwest the plains ants into the northeast. that has been a trend for the last several months. the cold arctic blast settling in. the current windchill temperatures as you head out the door this morning staying below zero in the teens in
. c p s says it's working to ensure a proper environment for students to take the test. according to some parents, but district made calls to stress the test is required by state and federal law. >> i am against it. i sent my daughter out of it because i am aware is not counting toward promotion or anything. >> the state board of education says the test provide a valuable data on how districts are ferrying in meeting higher benchmarks. this morning the test is supposed to be administered to all students grades 3-8 regardless of whether they are opting out. back to you. >> suspended. getting a second chance. cbs took away their city championship and their 24 victories because they used players that were academically ineligible. the head coach was suspended. now the illinois high school association says the school can still be in the state tournament. there will keep their top seed but they still won't have two of their best players or coaches. parents of players at other schools have mixed reactions. >> i think they should have a chance especially if there were number one the work
decided that he would try to answer that question and he runs this environment will help program and collected sippy cups from and sentnd toys "r" us them to an independent lab in texas to be tested. he found out in fact roughly 1/3 of them did contain estrogen-like chemicals. >> in that pink sippy cup? >> his daughter's sippy cup was reaching estrogenic chemicals. his fears were founded. >> what can i do to her? >> this is the big question. we know a lot about bpa. it is one of the most of the chemicals on the planet. and we know these chemicals generally are associated with a range of negative health effects. but the specific effect of any slightlymical varies from chemical to chemical. we actually don't know what chemical is leaching out of that sippy cup. it is impossible to know. there is a high correlation with rest cancer -- with breast cancer. other specific diseases vary from chemical to chemical. michael green, the way he describes it as an implant science experiment that we are on our families all of the time. >> we're going to take a break and then come back to this d
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
environment, and i would hope that everyone understand that it is all about order. and if we don't have order, we cannot provide programs. we're constantly looking down institutions. since the hearing in 2012, we have restricted housing population reduction by 25 perce percent. we have gone from 13.5 percent to 6.5 percent. so reductions are occurring. we are only interested in placing people in restrictive housing when there is justification. we have 20,000 gang members in our system. they are watching this hearing. they are watching our testimony very, very closely for the reason being if they see we will lower standards and not hold the individuals accountable, it puts the staff and inmates at risk. and this is why i mentioned in my oral statement, we are looking at staff being injured and harmed but our staff is putting their lives on the line to protect the american public. and we have inmates within the population who are being harmed by these individuals who have no respect, i mean no respect for other's when it comes to their safety. we cannot afford, at any time, to say that for thos
for a solitary confinement has left some sense reductions environment to of violence, restraint shares, inmates can themselves up which used to happen every week. almost totally eliminated as a result of these changes. reducing the duration. those that used to go there for drugs, they may still go, but if they test claim of bacon graduate out of solitary confinement and a summit is being kept for more than 72 hours a decision is reviewed by the commissioner. i also want to know that one of the keys in texas to reduce in solitary confinement has been the gain enunciation program. announcing their gang. i also want to point out that using sanctions and incentives behind bars is a way to provide for incentives that the inmates to be a better which therefore reduces the need for solitary confinement. one of the models of the parallel universe model. the longer curfew. does that ms. b gave have been denied privileges such as making donegals and access to the mail and other things. this creates a positive incentive. we notice things like the white hope program. there is a 24 hours timeout. we have to
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
? >> well, it's a new operational environment for him. where we want him to work is the new york city subway system. we do transit canine. because it's a stressful environment overseas in afghanistan, he -- it's very hard for a dog to work in our subway system. >> tell the people what he's going to be doing. by the way, what experience did he learn over there that he can translate into saving lives here in new york? >> cesar is an explosive detection dog. he's trained on all the odors we train on here in new york. he does have 12 legitimate finds in afghanistan. so he's proven. now what we're going to do is transition him into a police dog. he's going to be patrolling the new york city subway system. >> so you guys are going to go through a 12-week session together? >> yes. >> new training. >> what needs to be done? >> i'm not sure. we haven't started the training yet. we're starting as of this week. i'm new to the transit system. i came from a precinct. >> so you're both starting together. he's going to start with a new name, correct? >> no, we're going to keep the name. >> oh, that's great
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
the environment and clean water standards is not antigrowth. in fact, it's projobs. when i recently toured the family-run trucking company in my district, they were not against truck safety standards. they do the right thing by their workers and they abide by safe driving rules. and they want regulations to ensure that others do the same. what they are against are new truck safety standards that hinder growth without actually making trucking any safer. smarter regulations should protect good businesses from bad actors. i'll give you another example. denny hudson, he runs sea coast bank, a small community bank in florida. like many small financial institutions, they weathered the financial crisis because they were not involved in the risky financial behavior. they expected mortgages to be repaid on time and they wanted the small businesses they supported to succeed. after the financial crisis of 2008, nearly took down the global economy, most people agreed that government regulators needed to better protect our financial system. but if new regulations keep community banks like sea coast fro
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud -- >> reporter: in december 1977, california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, top tom delay utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock, tolled utility towers. it spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil came here and dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred case of cocci here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> it killed 6. and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area in the 1970s. the symptoms are pretty common, similar to a cold or flu. sometimes they include a rash. >>> bye-bye barge. the mysterious google barge is leavin
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
of all technological environment. he was so important he called him my boy. he came to the united states and worked under this program that at the time i did not know was called "operation paperclip." how did this work? have you go to having the pentagon as a boss? and when he retired in the '70s he was given the distinguished civilian service award which is the highest award that the department of defense can give to a non uniformed person. to understand "operation paperclip" you really must go back to the fall of 1944. that was a very dark time. this was a rise and fall of the third reich. landing at normandy pushing to munich and berlin. among the soldiers are scientist with the u.s. military. they are part of a secret mission to find what they call atomic biological chemical weapons. abc weapons. the real threat but city will who was the head of the operation was a particle physicist learn to sitting in the abandoned apartment in november 1944 that the atomic program telling him his minister of armaments atomic science is jewish science. said don't concentrate on that. i am paraphras
they claim it will damage the environment and contribute to global warming. >>> back to the weather now and a live look over the national mall where all of the smithsonian museums but one will be closed tomorrow because of the snow. the air and space museum will keep doors open. all the other museums and the national zoo will be closed. >>> president obama is scheduled to meet tomorrow with israeli prim minister lead by the u.s. and secretary of state john kerry. there will be no votes in the house or senate because of the snow. >>> with the big winter storm developing overnight, it's hard to believe where we were just 12 hours ago on the national mall, i mean, people walking, riding bikes, jogging. look, the temperatures were in the 50s, so we saw folks out in shorts, t-shirts, some broke out theites. we talked to one jogger who says she is done with this roller coaster winter. >> it's been crazy like one day you can be outside in shorts and sunny and two days later icy and snowy and miserable. not too fun. >> you know what happens when you try to get off the roller coaster before the
attempt. >> and a delicate balancing act between the environment and economy at lake tahoe. >> and a live look tonight from the top of mount tam you'll see how wet weather improved outlook for water supply. good evening. this next round of rain isn't a strong storm, but every drop counts in a drought, obviously. spencer? >> you're right. and we're counting many drops w. you can see light rainfall now. you can see that right here in the san francisco area from san francisco and south we have a steady rainfall at the moment. giving you the looping radar, you can see batches of rain beginning and continuing i should saying to move into our direction. nearly 4-tenths in mount st. helena. again, rain continues throughout the evening and overnight hours the totals will grow and we'll have totals later. >> the storm isn't looking like a big rain maker but last two were stronger and wetter. wayne freedman joins us with a look. >> people have been hearing about the drought. bad
environment. >>> about a half hour ago crews in concord finally managed to fix a big water main break. water was pouring out of this rupture about 1:00 this afternoon on san miguel road closing the road most of the day. right now san miguel is back open. >>> pink is the color. friends left messages, flowers and a partly cloudy soccer ball at the scene -- pink soccer ball at the scene where a train hit and killed her. the 8th grade athlete was walking with friends. when they saw the train, they got out of the way, but jenna apparently went back to get her cell phone. >> i can't put it in words. it's really hard on a personal level. >> in every class she was in there was a box you could write letters or notes to her sitting at her desk. >> pink was jenna's favorite color. >>> scary scene at a texas airport today. this plane slammed into a terminal building and broke off its wing. this particular gate is so tight planes have to be towed into place. nobody was hurt. >>> tonight 16,000 russian troops are in crimea, the strategic peninsula that is part of ukraine. here's the very latest. russia re
? >> is always been a learning environment that i think the egg is part about it is meeting the people. 35,000 people who are early adopters. they are entrepreneurs and converge in this little funny place that is called austin, texas. it has become the place to meet people. one of the companies you will be looking for is atlas. this is about wearable technology? >> it is a big part of what is going on now. it is the buzz everywhere. atals is a great company because it really fits into the health category where we are trying to measure all of these things going on in our bodies and become more fit. all this take information about your exercise program and then you create graphs and you can track your progress, right? you can measured against your friends? >> really get into better shape. it is amazing how this company has such an amazing run and raised half $1 million already. me.3 and this is a different kind of investigation and health. tell us about it. >> they do dna testing. you mail it in and they could tell you a lot of things about your dna. you can learn where you came from, what d
vendors will need to be isolated to provide a secure environment for both staff and offenders. it strikes me that a great many people would think that solitary confinement, particularly for an extended amount of time is not an appropriate punishment for relatively minor infractions, but it could well be a necessary tool for those violent inmates and may pose a real threat to the safety of other inmates or guards. these are the members of this panel has interacted with the criminal-justice system in different capacities. as carmen in mr. thibodaux as inmates. mr. brouwer administering. mr. dear roche administering and helping bring hope and redemption to those incarcerated mr. levin studying in the important justice issues. the question that i would ask of all five of you is in your judgment based upon the different experiences you have had, is there an appropriate role for solitary confinement? is there a need for it? and in what circumstances it at all? and i would welcome the views of all five witnesses. >> in my mind right now, yes. but in a limited sense. that is because i have said t
the damages done to the environment. i agree that maybe colorado may get around this but it's expensive and doing a lot of damage to the environments the way it's being done in california. >> guest: as it turns out i actually did see that piece and because the people, the legalizers would say that is why this stuff needs to be legalized. if you got into the wilderness of california where they are growing the stuff yes they are using tremendous amounts of pesticides herbicides who knows what that the environmeenvironme ntal destruction out there is quite phenomenal. this is marijuana growth that is outside the law so people who are legalizers would say that's one more reason to ring it under some sort of state jurisdiction because that way the environmental benefits to legalizing marijuana. it's a great feast. if people are interested in this as an issue go on "mother jones." it's a very good piece. >> host: there's a tweet from one or viewers who says that in the girl scouts to sell cookies in front of stores. they will make a fortune. jokes aside. >> guest: which is what happened last
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